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Divine forgiveness: Phase 1

The Development of Forgiveness

The Boundaries of Early Forgiveness

Implementation of forgiveness education to increase agape love in three culturally distinct areas: Belfast, Israel/Palestine, and Hong Kong

Individual differences and children’s motivations for forgiveness

A Darwinian Reconciliation: The Evolutionary Psychology of Human Forgiveness

The Benefits of Forgiveness

During the late 1990s, in the aftermath of the fall of Communism, Nelson Mandela’s election in South Africa, and an easing of the conflict in Northern Ireland, the world faced a new era in which former enemies tried to work with each other. Forgiveness took on new significance beyond religion, with which it had often been associated. The John Templeton Foundation issued a call for proposals that resulted in 20 funded grants, establishment of the non-profit organization, A Campaign for Forgiveness Research, which funded eight additional grants, and a total of almost $10 million put toward research on forgiveness. By…

Forgetting and Forgiving: Exploring the Connections between Memory and Forgiveness

The Science of Forgiveness in the Practice of Preaching

WATCH: The Importance of Imparting Forgiveness in Schools

How does the concept of “forgiveness” vary across cultures? Can it be taught in classrooms, and if so, how do we teach it most effectively?  These and other questions fueled a conversation among scholars at this year’s Forgiveness Forum, the third in a virtual conversation series hosted by the Templeton World Charity Foundation that explores the benefits of forgiveness for personal growth and global healing.   The virtual conversation, moderated by Time Magazine reporter Katie Reilly, took place during World Education Week, and focused on the connection between forgiveness and educational outcomes. Forum panelists included Dr. Peli Galiti, a visiting scholar with…

Practicing Forgiveness Tour

Humility and Forgiveness: The Role of Social Relations among Three Ethnic Groups

Explore the Science of Forgiveness

During the late 1990s, in the aftermath of the fall of Communism, Nelson Mandela’s election in South Africa, and an easing of the conflict in Northern Ireland, the world faced a new era in which former enemies tried to work with each other. Forgiveness took on new significance beyond religion, with which it had often been associated. The John Templeton Foundation issued a call for proposals that resulted in 20 funded grants, establishment of the non-profit organization, A Campaign for Forgiveness Research, which funded eight additional grants, and a total of almost $10 million put toward research on forgiveness. By…

Ecclesial Theology and the Virtue of Forgiveness

Video: The Science of Forgiveness

Learn about the latest research in the science of forgiveness with Dr. Amrisha Vaish, an associate professor of psychology at the University of Virginia and leader of a project studying the development of forgiveness supported by the John Templeton Foundation. She discusses studies demonstrating that young children are drawn to those who show remorse, suggesting that forgiveness is a deep-seated and important ability for our species. So why do we all sometimes struggle to do it? This is the second video in our series of interviews produced by the independent media company Freethink. Watch the first episode here, which features…

Building virtue: environmental and social influences on the development of fairness, forgiveness, honesty, and trustworthiness

WATCH: For Children, Saying ‘Sorry’ Is One Thing. Understanding What It Means Is Another.

Along with "please" and "thank you," saying sorry is one of the earliest phrases that many parents teach their children. They do this because it's an important nicety: people say "sorry" to show remorse, to ask for forgiveness, and to show basic concern and awareness of others' needs. But when do children really understand the significance of apologies? When do they begin to care whether a person shows remorse for doing harm -- for ripping up a child's picture, for example, or pushing someone to the ground? These are some of the questions driving the research of Dr. Amrisha Vaish, associate…

Prayer, Relationships, and Health

Over the course of dozens of studies, Frank Fincham has compiled an impressive list of ways that prayer and forgiveness make a difference. Frank Fincham, who holds an endowed chair of the Florida State University College of Human Sciences, is a former Rhodes Scholar with an Oxford doctorate and a long track record of insightful study of relationships, religious practice, and health. In 2011 he was the recipient, as director of the FSU Family Institute, of a $1.13 million, four-year grant from the John Templeton Foundation to investigate the ways that prayer and forgiveness affect relational well-being and physical health.…

The Question of Character: Equipping the Next Generation

Research: The Surprising Power of Prayer in Relationships

Scientists explore prayer’s power to change us—and how we care for others In moments of joy, delight, and wonder, humans pray. In great need, in adulation, in fear and trembling, humans pray. To Allah, Jesus, Buddha, Vishnu, to our ancestors, to God—and to gods—humans pray. We pray even if we don’t know what—or if—we believe. For as long as humans have a history, we see signs of prayer. The human impulse to pray is reflected across millennia of art and culture. In contemporary times, movies and books are rife with characters casting themselves on a higher power. Beyond the ubiquitous…

The Character Course: Design, dissemination and evaluation of a church-based small group programme for character development

The Question of Character: Expanding the Veritas Forum Model to Engage the Next Generation

Promoting Character Strength Development in Youths Through Interactive Storytelling Online: A Pilot Project

Orienting People toward Forgivingness

Religion, Spirituality, Aging, and Health

Monthly Grant Report – July 2019

Recently Approved Grants Character Virtue Development Project Title Grantee(s) Project Leader(s) Grant Amount #CultivatingCharacter: A Global Movement to Cultivate Character both Online and Off Through Living 24/6 Let it Ripple, Inc Tiffany Shlain $350,000 Exemplar Interventions to Develop Character Wake Forest University Eranda Jayawickreme, Michael Lamb $1,686,200 Identifying Metrics of Character Development in Adults: Insights from shared life in L’Arche L'Arche USA Tina Bovermann, Brenna Case $220,000 Individual differences and children’s motivations for forgiveness Trustees of Boston University Peter Blake $233,917 Innovative Videos for the Greater Good Regents of the University of California at Berkeley Jason Marsh $234,800   Human…

Video: What Is Life?

Have we encountered alien life already and just not realized it? Will deepening our understanding of life in the universe transform our understanding of ourselves? Explore the profound questions surrounding the nature and origins of life that propel the research of astrobiologist Dr. Sara Walker of Arizona State University in this interview. Walker is the recipient of a $2.9 million grant from the John Templeton Foundation for a project, co-led by Templeton Prize laureate Paul Davies, to explore the transitions bridging chemistry and the origins of life. What Is Life? "Life is literally the physics of creativity," says Walker. "It's…

Video: The Science of Morality

Right and wrong, good and evil -- when viewing the world, our moral judgments often feel clear-cut and consistent. Research shows, however, that we're willing to be more forgiving and flexible with those who are socially close to us, while applying sterner judgments to those who are far away. Why do we make these exceptions? And how can we broaden our sense of morality to be more fair to people outside of our tribes? Learn more about the science of morality in this interview with Dr. Liane Young, professor of psychology at Boston College. Young is the project co-leader with…

The Character and Virtue Development in Youth Ministry (CVDYM) Project

Innovative Videos for the Greater Good

Can Leadership Virtues be Taught? Developing Virtuous School Leaders

Mental Healthcare, Virtue, and Human Flourishing

Character Strength Interventions in Adolescents: Engaging Scholars and Practitioners to Promote Virtue Development

Global Resilience Oral Workshops (GROW) Zambia: A Storytelling Approach to Hope and Resilience through Character Training and Spiritual Practices

Character Strength Interventions in Adolescents: Engaging Scholars and Practitioners to Promote Virtue Development

Gratitude as a Fount of Virtue: Examining How Gratitude Fosters Other Noble Character Traits

Cultivating Relational Virtues in Parents and Children

The Joy Campaign: Sharing the Wisdom of the Dalai Lama and Desmond Tutu to Bring Spiritual Practice to Contemporary Generations

Center for Pastor Theologians

Enhancing Practice-Based Evidence for Spiritually Integrated Psychotherapies: An Interdisciplinary Big Data Project

Cultivating Virtue: Servant Leadership Development for Education

Publishing illustrated children’s books and workbooks that teach and encourage character and virtue development in generations of Muslim children

Bringing Spiritually Oriented Psychotherapies into the Healthcare Mainstream: A Preparatory Grant Proposal for an International Grant Competition

Deity prototypes in individuals and families

A Value-Ethical Approach to Assessing Virtues: Comparative and Cross-Cultural Validity

What is Known about Existing Measures: Meta-Analyses of Psychometric Properties of Measures of Eleven Character Strengths

A Course of Study Strengthening Character Development in Jewish Communities through Tikkun Middot, Applying Mindfulness to Practice of Moral Qualities

Spiritual Exemplars Program

Character Virtue Development Evaluation Capacity Building Initiative

WATCH: In Love, Saying ‘Thanks’ Is Surprisingly Powerful

Gratitude is known to have powerful effects for one's own wellbeing, reducing anxiety and depression, and helping us to enjoy positive experiences. Now, thanks in part to research led by Dr. Sara Algoe of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, we see the effects of expressing thanks not only on relationships, but on society as a whole. Those who say thank you to their romantic partners more often not only experience closer bonds, but they are also perceived as being more lovable by others. These benefits have a ripple effect outward from our personal relationships to our friendship…

John Templeton Foundation Approves Over $49 Million in New Programs

During the final quarter of 2020, the Board of Trustees of the John Templeton Foundation approved 31 funding requests with an approximate total value of over $49 million, the Foundation has announced. "The proposals we have approved show exceptional promise to benefit humanity by contributing to human flourishing," said Heather Templeton Dill, President of the John Templeton Foundation. "Like all the work we support, these projects aim to contribute new perspectives and ideas to subjects of profound importance. Such topics have included research on forgiveness, intellectual humility, and the origins of life, as well as projects that advance our strategic priorities…

Monthly Grant Report – March 2020

Recently Approved Grants Human Sciences Project Title Grantee(s) Project Leader(s) Grant Amount Developing Belief: The Development and Diversity of Religious Cognition and Behavior: Phase 1 University of California, Riverside Rebekah Richert; Kathleen Corriveau $9,866,732 Pew-Templeton Global Religious Futures Project Phase VI Pew Charitable Trusts Alan Cooperman $2,446,900   Philosophy and Theology Project Title Grantee(s) Project Leader(s) Grant Amount Social virtue epistemology: What does it take to be an intellectually humble Socratic gadfly? Macquarie University Mark Alfano; Jay Van Bavel $797,870 The Launch of MA & PhD Degrees in Philosophy and the Foundations of Science for Latin America Asociación Civil de…

Free Will

Choice matters: New insights into the philosophy, psychology, theology, and neuroscience of free will  INTRODUCTION Our lives might be well-described as a rich and endless chain of decisions and consequences: just about everything we do, say, or even think can be described as some form of selection between options (say this or that, stand or don’t stand, pick out this item at the market). But are all those choices really ours — given the exact starting conditions, was everything that happens simply bound to happen? And if so, is choice (and the responsibility for our choices) simply an illusion?…

Monthly Grant Report – February 2019

Recently Approved Grants Human Sciences Project Title Grantee(s) Project Leader(s) Grant Amount What is Religious Experience? Validating and Testing the Inventory of Non-Ordinary Experiences University of California Santa Barbara Ann Taves; Michael Barlev $234,521 Using Self-Reported Religiosity/Spirituality to Predict Mental Health Outcomes and Biological Correlates Research Foundation for Mental Hygiene, Inc. Myrna Weissman; Connie Svob $234,302 Project Amazing Grace Phase 2: Making Sense of Grace Biola University Peter Hill $234,779   Philosophy & Theology Project Title Grantee(s) Project Leader(s) Grant Amount When and Why We Explain: Need for Explanation and Tolerance for Mystery in Science and Religion The Trustees of…

The Psychology of Spiritual Struggle

To struggle is one of the great inevitabilities of the human experience. We struggle with many things, from mundane inconveniences to the great, character-defining obstacles that shape our lives. For many people, spiritual struggles are among the deepest and more core-shaking of all conflicts. Moments of spiritual struggle cut to the very heart of our beliefs, values, and practices, raising questions that challenge the essence of our identities: Who am I? Why am I here? Am I a good person? Spirituality can serve as a beacon of hope and a source of comfort for many people over the course of…

Faith: Is It Real If You Never Kneel?

Religious faith entails action, not just right belief Faith in anything requires action. We don’t just talk about our faith; we eventually have to step out onto the metaphorical bridge. Think of the ways we act out our faith in the context of relationships: When you trust your partner’s commitment, you don’t snoop through their emails. The same applies to personal safety. If you believe that an airplane will stay aloft in the sky, you board the flight. These daily choices are acts of faith, whether or not we think of them as such. What about religious faith? Is trust…

Can We Know God? New Insights From Religious Epistemology

Are religious beliefs rational? Is knowledge of God even possible? Are the evils we observe in the world evidence against God’s existence? Since the late twentieth century, epistemological questions of this nature have been central to the philosophy of religion. The work of two leading theistic philosophers, Alvin Plantiga and Richard Swinburne, divided the field of research into two distinct research programs. Broadly speaking, the debates between the two camps are representative of two larger positions in epistemology: internalism, according to which the rationality of beliefs is only determined by factors internally accessible to the believer; and externalists, according to…

August 2021: Monthly Grant Report

Recently Approved Grants Public Engagement Mathematics and Physical Sciences Natural Sciences Human Sciences Character Virtue Development Project Title  Science, Explored: Radiolab on Science and the Big Questions Establishing a Templeton LSST Early-Career Research Fellowship The Role of Cultural Evolution in Human Understanding Global Flourishing Study: Piloting and Waves 1-5 Validation and Unification of Love Measurement  Grantee(s) New York Public Radio LSST Inc Chancellor, Master and Scholars of the University of Oxford Baylor University The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill  Project Leader(s) Suzie Lechtenburg Jennifer Sokoloski Geoffrey Bird, Caroline Catmur Byron Johnson, Tyler VanderWeele Sara Algoe  Amount $1,513,801 $6,970,779…

The Origins of Life

Why is the study of the origins of life so difficult and perplexing? One reason is that it took place a long time ago — more than 3.5 billion years. Second, the planetary conditions on ancient Earth may have been dramatically different than now, making questionable any inferences we draw from the present. Third, we’re only familiar with the history of life on one planet, so we don’t even know whether life is an extremely rare or common phenomenon in the Universe. The Origins of Life and Human Identity Given these challenges, one might wonder why we trouble ourselves with…

Foundation Approves Over $105 Million in New Programs

In June and July 2021, the Board of Trustees of the John Templeton Foundation approved 91 funding requests with an approximate total value of $105 million to support new programs. Learn more about recent projects we have funded that are now active. These include: Investigating how the arrow of time emerges from the building blocks of reality How and when children learn how to forgive Exploring the health effects of religion and spirituality The role that gratitude plays in long-term relationships Understanding the limits of our current knowledge Developing a global perspective on the philosophy of religion Addressing poverty in…

What Does a Meteorite Smell Like?: Extraterrestrial Matter Has Uncanny Odors That Hint at Life’s Origins

At 10:58 in the morning of September 28, 1969 a fireball appeared in the sky above Murchison, Australia, a farming town 167 kilometers north of Melbourne. Residents reported hearing a tremor and said that afterwards the town was suffused with an organic odor that reminded them of methylated spirits. In the days that followed, people searched the countryside to find fallen pieces of the meteorite. More than 100 kilograms of material were recovered, over four times the amount the Apollo 11 astronauts had brought back to earth from the first lunar landing nine weeks earlier. Like those lunar rocks, the…

The Science of Prayer

Am I alone? Can anyone hear me? Whether expressed in words or sensed emotionally, it is possible to imagine these questions as the beginnings of the first prayer. Likewise, it is easy to imagine that, once begun, the ways of praying quickly multiplied to include discrete thoughts, behaviors, and emotions, accompanied by physical objects, employed in specific locations, both built and naturally occurring. These experiential and physical developments accompanying the act of prayer, it turns out, are comparatively easy to measure and, in some cases, predict. More challenging is the effort to discern the origins and examine the science of…

Did Religion Help the Rise of Civilizations in the Americas?

Religions and the Emergence of Civilizations in the Americas In our contemporary culture, it is often assumed that organized religion is a conservative force that impedes the development of human societies. Depending on one’s allegiances, one may view religion as an obstacle that must be overcome, or as a fortification against society’s descent into chaos. But rarely does anyone stop and ask the question, “To what degree might religion actually contribute to cultural innovation and progress of a society?” Historians in recent years have challenged the modernist assumption that religious institutions are obstacles to human flourishing. Rather than accepting this…

Video: The Neuroscience of Free Will

Watch our latest video, which features Chapman University computational neuroscientist Uri Maoz discussing the latest research into the enduring mysteries of free will. What does the neuroscience of free will reveal about how we make decisions, and what does that imply about our ability to consciously control ourselves and our future? Maoz is the leader of a major project backed by $5.3 million in funding from the John Templeton Foundation that sets out to test whether a robust understanding of free will can be backed by scientific evidence. Learn more on the latest research by reading this white-paper on the…

Science of Optimism & Hope

What are the benefits shown by the science of optimism and hope? Human beings are ambitious and goal-oriented creatures. Many, for example, aim at stable and fulfilling careers, good health, and happy families. Some also pursue broader aims, such as social justice, technological progress, or scientific discovery. But with such ambition comes adversity. When our central aims come under threat, as they inevitably do, we often find ourselves pessimistic or fearful. Despair might threaten to take hold. It is thus tempting to look to hope and optimism as ways of withstanding, or even smothering, these negative emotions. But should we?…

Foundation-Supported Researchers Win Nobel Prize and MacArthur Fellowship

Two researchers who have received support from the John Templeton Foundation were announced this week as winners of the Nobel Prize and the MacArthur Fellowship. Jennifer A. Doudna of the University of California, Berkeley won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for her work on developing a method for editing the genome. She received the award jointly with Dr. Emmanuelle Charpentier of France. Doudna was the co-leader of a John Templeton Foundation-supported project to convene discussions among scientists, ethicists, and civil and religious leaders on the challenges and opportunities of gene editing and to develop “a set of common principles to…

Collaborative Inquiries in Christian Theological Anthropology

A new project will foster interdisciplinary work — informed by both science and theology — on what it means to be human Human flourishing and freedom are topics that have long been considered by theologians and humanities scholars, but recent work in the life and social sciences—on subjects ranging from how brains make decisions to how individuals develop virtues — is presenting some of those age-old topics in a new light. A new three-year, $3.9 million research project funded by the John Templeton Foundation and led by theologians Jesse Couenhoven at Villanova University, and Gerald McKenny and Neil Arner at…

Q&A: Five Questions with Jason Marsh

Jason Marsh is the executive director of the Greater Good Science Center (GGSC) at the University of California, Berkeley, and the founding editor-in-chief of the center’s award-winning online magazine, Greater Good. The GGSC sponsors research into social and emotional well-being and provides resources to help people apply this research to their personal and professional lives. Marsh was recently featured in TIME magazine’s “Apart. Not Alone” series responding to the COVID-19 crisis in a list of “27 People Bridging Divides Across America.” The GGSC has published an online Guide to Well-Being during Coronavirus, including advice about approaches for practicing character virtues…

How Grantees Are Helping With COVID-19

Templeton Grantees Respond to the Coronavirus At the beginning of 1665, a deadly plague shuttered Cambridge University and sent a 23-year-old Isaac Newton back to his family estate. There, in relative seclusion, Newton thought and wrote and calculated — making breakthroughs in calculus, motion, optics, and gravitation. Newton’s annus mirabilis has become an oft-repeated (and at times embellished) chestnut in the history of science, but it gets at the truth that when the world is turned upside-down and many possibilities are foreclosed, others can open up.  Today, as then, tragedy, uncertainty, and massive shifts in the rules of everyday life…

Monthly Grant Report – December 2019 & January 2020

Recently Approved Grants Human Sciences Project Title Grantee(s) Project Leader(s) Grant Amount Religious belief, health and disease: a family perspective. I. Data collection University of Bristol Jean Golding; Kate Northstone $234,800 Scholarship for International Faculty/Students to Attend Spirituality & Health Research Workshop Duke University Harold Koenig; Benjamin Doolittle $115,411   Natural Sciences Project Title Grantee(s) Project Leader(s) Grant Amount Social Practices, Scientific Practice, and Human Evolution Wesleyan University Joseph Rouse $233,297   Philosophy and Theology Project Title Grantee(s) Project Leader(s) Grant Amount Panentheism and Religious Life The Johns Hopkins University Yitzhak Melamed; Clare Carlisle $232,748 SCP Graduate Fellowships for Science…

Report Shows Key Role for Communication at Science Philanthropies

In a time marked by scientific discovery and technological advancement, a new report identifies a promising area for greater investment by science philanthropies: communication. The report, Identifying Best Practices for Communications Workforce at Science Philanthropies, was developed through a collaboration by the Rita Allen, Albert and Mary Lasker, and John Templeton Foundations to identify challenges and opportunities in science philanthropy communications. Philanthropy’s contributions are critical to advancing scientific research, providing essential support for new ideas and major initiatives. However, the report finds, science philanthropies can amplify their impact considerably by investing more purposefully in communications as a central part of…

Strategic Priority Q&A: Science of Virtues

This conversation is the third in a series of conversations about the Strategic Priorities that the John Templeton Foundation will be funding over the next five years. This interview with Sarah Clement, Senior Director, Character Virtue Development, was conducted and edited by Benjamin Carlson, Director, Strategic Communication. To get started, why don’t you share a little about your story – what brought you to the Foundation? What made you interested and excited about this place? I pursued a PhD in psychology because I was curious about human behavior and wanted to be able to have the skills to answer questions…

Monthly Grant Report – June 2019

Recently Approved Grants Human Sciences Project Title Grantee(s) Project Leader(s) Grant Amount Knoxville Marriage Initiative: Partnering with churches to deliver science-based interventions to solve a community problem The University of Tennessee Kristina Gordon $234,800   Natural Sciences Project Title Grantee(s) Project Leader(s) Grant Amount The creative role of stress in evolution and development Yale University Gunter Wagner; Alan Love $886,152   Philosophy & Theology Project Title Grantee(s) Project Leader(s) Grant Amount What Breathes Fire into the Equations: The Metaphysics of laws of nature Rutgers University Foundation Barry Loewer $167,325 The Fine-tuning Argument: A Curated Bibliography The University of Mississippi Neil…

Positive Neuroscience

POSITIVE NEUROSCIENCE: INTRODUCTION For much of its history the study of the human brain had a negative tilt, focusing on the atypical, the abnormal, the injured, and (because of the difficulty of accessing the living brain) the deceased. But in recent times neuroscience has taken a positive turn. Technologies like fMRI scans allow researchers to safely observe the healthy human brain in action, and a growing interest in the scientific study of human flourishing has led to the emergence of “positive neuroscience” — a burgeoning field of study that focuses on the nervous system mechanisms that underlie well-being. The development…

Physicist and Cosmologist Marcelo Gleiser Awarded Templeton Prize at Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

“Science is a flirtation with the unknown, a recognition that we know little of the world around us…” Theoretical physicist and cosmologist Marcelo Gleiser was awarded the 2019 Templeton Prize at a ceremony Wednesday evening, May 29, at the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium in New York City. “Science is a flirtation with the unknown, a recognition that we know little of the world around us, which we can perceive only imperfectly,” Professor Gleiser said in his Templeton Prize address at the ceremony.  “Yet, as it embraces the quest for knowledge, it lifts the human spirit and…

The Evolution of Cooperation

Explaining the evolution of cooperation — one of life’s most common, complex, and paradoxical phenomena  It’s easy to take cooperation for granted. Children team up to complete a project on time. Neighbors help each other mend fences. Colleagues share ideas and resources. The very fabric of human society depends upon working together. Cooperation is also ubiquitous in the natural world: lions collaborate on hunts, flowers share nectar with bees, and even bacteria produce essential resources that benefit their neighbors. But cooperation goes beyond mere quid pro quo — mutual aid for mutual benefit — and also takes the form of…

Future-Mindedness

Great Expectations: New insights into how and why we think about the future What do you expect to be doing in five seconds? Five months? Five decades? Thinking about the future is a form of mental time travel at which humans are uniquely skilled. Psychologists call it prospection or future-mindedness, and some have argued it offers an invaluable framework for understanding topics ranging from perception, cognition, imagination, and memory to free will and consciousness itself. In a 2013 paper — later expanded into the book Homo Prospectus — University of Pennsylvania psychologist Martin E. P. Seligman and co-authors Peter Railton,…

Marcelo Gleiser Wins 2019 Templeton Prize

MARCELO GLEISER AWARDED 2019 TEMPLETON PRIZE   WEST CONSHOHOCKEN, PA. – Marcelo Gleiser, theoretical physicist, cosmologist, and a leading proponent of the view that science, philosophy, and spirituality are complementary expressions of humanity’s need to embrace mystery and the unknown, was announced today as the 2019 Templeton Prize Laureate. Gleiser, 60, the Appleton Professor of Natural Philosophy and a professor of physics and astronomy at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire, has earned international acclaim through his books, essays, blogs, TV documentaries, and conferences that present science as a spiritual quest to understand the origins of the universe and of…

2019 Templeton Prize Laureate to be announced on Tuesday, March 19

FOR RELEASE: Monday, March 4, 2019     2019 Templeton Prize Laureate to be announced on Tuesday, March 19 49th winner of £1.1 million annual prize for spiritual progress   Event: Announcement of the 2019 Templeton Prize Laureate Date: Tuesday, March 19, 6:00 AM EDT (Philadelphia) / 10:00 hours GMT Venue: Online at www.templetonprize.org; via email to journalists; Twitter via @TempletonPrize; #TempletonPrize2019   The winner of the 2019 Templeton Prize will be announced on Tuesday, March 19 at 6:00 AM EDT (Philadelphia) / 10:00 hours GMT, online at www.templetonprize.org, via email to journalists, and on Twitter via @TempletonPrize. Valued at 1.1 million British…

Monthly Grant Report – January 2019

Recently Approved Grants Human Sciences Project Title Grantee(s) Project Leader(s) Grant Amount Tracking and Understanding the Effects of Transformative Events in People’s Lives Regents of the University of Michigan Rada Mihalcea; James Pennebaker $1,684,328 Systematic Review and Analysis of US Federal Investments in Research on Religion and Health University of Connecticut Crystal Park; John Salsman $234,207 The Third Religion, Economics and Society (RES) Initiative: Making the Economic Study of Religion and Religious Markets a Field of the Future Chapman University Jared Rubin $325,346 Divine forgiveness: Phase 1 Florida State University Research Foundation Inc. Frank Fincham $233,994 Religion and human flourishing…

An Education in Character: Building a New Curriculum to Teach Virtues to Future School Leaders

The ideal of a servant leader — one who focuses on the needs of others and guides through persuasion rather than the exercise of raw power — has been upheld by religious leaders and philosophers for millennia. Only recently, however, has it found its place in the sociological theory of leadership styles. Today, servant leadership is at the heart of a new program to help future educational leaders develop their own core virtues and learn to shape those of the institutions they will eventually lead. The program, funded with a recent $2.4 million grant from the John Templeton Foundation and…

The King and the Cathedral

Celebrating King Abdullah II’s call for Muslims — and others — to enact their love of God and neighbor Cathedrals don’t just happen overnight — they require of their planners, funders, and craftsmen a time horizon better suited for institutions than individuals, and a willingness to do one’s work without the guarantee of ever seeing the end result. The first proposal for the church that became the Washington National Cathedral was made in 1791, but it was more than a century before the builders laid the foundation stone. Its main sanctuary opened to the public in 1932. In 1990, nearly…

His Majesty
King Abdullah II of Jordan Receives Templeton Prize

“Everything you honor me for simply carries onward what Jordanians have always done, and how Jordanians have always lived—in mutual kindness, harmony, and brotherhood” His Majesty King Abdullah II of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan was awarded the 2018 Templeton Prize in the presence of ambassadors, Jordanian and U.S. government officials, and Washington political leaders, faith leaders, the media, and society at a ceremony Tuesday evening at Washington National Cathedral. “Today, I am truly humbled to be recognized by all of you. But let me say, everything you honor me for simply carries onward what Jordanians have always done, and how…

2018 TEMPLETON PRIZE CEREMONY TO HONOR
HIS MAJESTY
KING ABDULLAH II OF JORDAN

CONTACT: Donald Lehr – The Nolan/Lehr Group +1 (212) 967-8200 / mob +1 (917) 304-4058 dblehr@cs.com / www.templetonprize.org FOR RELEASE: Tuesday, November 6, 2018 .     2018 TEMPLETON PRIZE CEREMONY TO HONOR HIS MAJESTY KING ABDULLAH II OF JORDAN   His Majesty King Abdullah II of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan will receive the 2018 Templeton Prize in the presence of ambassadors, Jordanian and U.S. government officials, and Washington political leaders, faith leaders, and society on Tuesday, November 13, 7:00 PM, at a ceremony to be held at the Washington National Cathedral.  Admission to the ceremony is strictly by…

King Abdullah II of Jordan Awarded 2018 Templeton Prize

CONTACT: Donald Lehr – The Nolan/Lehr Group +1 (212) 967-8200 / mob +1 (917) 304-4058 dblehr@cs.com / www.templetonprize.org FOR RELEASE: Wednesday, June 27, 2018 6:00 AM EDT / 10:00 hours GMT     KING ABDULLAH II OF JORDAN AWARDED 2018 TEMPLETON PRIZE   WEST CONSHOHOCKEN, PA. – King Abdullah II of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan, who has done more to seek religious harmony within Islam and between Islam and other religions than any other living political leader, was announced today as the 2018 Templeton Prize Laureate. Known for his grace and humility, the King’s long quest to promote peace-affirming…

2018 Templeton Prize Laureate to be announced on Wednesday, June 27

FOR RELEASE: Tuesday, April 17, 2018   2018 Templeton Prize Laureate to be announced on Wednesday, June 27 48th winner of £1.1 million annual prize for spiritual progress   Event: Announcement of the 2018 Templeton Prize Laureate Date: Wednesday, June 27, 6:00 AM EDT (Philadelphia) / 10:00 hours GMT Venue: Online at www.templetonprize.org; via email to journalists; Twitter via @TempletonPrize; #TempletonPrize2018   The winner of the 2018 Templeton Prize will be announced on Wednesday, June 27 at 6:00 AM EDT (Philadelphia) / 10:00 hours GMT, online at www.templetonprize.org, via email to journalists, and on Twitter via @TempletonPrize. Valued at 1.1 million British pounds,…

Intellectual Humility

Psychologists and philosophers are working to tease apart the ways we respond to new ideas and information — and the possible benefits of intellectual humility.  Saint Augustine famously called humility the foundation of all other virtues. One variety of humility, intellectual humility, is perhaps the most foundational when it comes to the interests of the John Templeton Foundation. Intellectual humility is a mindset that guides our intellectual conduct. In particular, it involves recognizing and owning our intellectual limitations in the service of pursuing deeper knowledge, truth, and understanding. Such a mindset appears to be valuable in many domains of life…

The Psychology of Purpose

Reviewing six decades of research into the meaning, development, and benefits of purpose in life Modern scientific research on human purpose has its origins in, of all places, a Holocaust survivor’s experiences in a series of Nazi concentration camps. While a prisoner at Theresienstadt, Auschwitz and two satellite camps of Dachau, Viennese psychologist Viktor Frankl noticed that fellow prisoners who had a sense of purpose showed greater resilience to the torture, slave labor, and starvation rations to which they were subjected. Writing of his experience later, he found a partial explanation in a quote from Friedrich Nietzsche, “Those who have…

Atheism and Unbelief

Towards a psychology and sociology of atheism and non-belief If the world’s estimated 1.1 billion atheists and non-believers were grouped together as their own “religion,” they would be the world’s third-largest, trailing only Christianity and Islam. Any serious psychology or sociology of religion must take into account the beliefs and experiences of non-believers — yet the scientific study of atheism and non-belief has lagged behind the study of religions, with varied forms of non-belief often relegated to being defined by what they aren’t rather than what they are. The John Templeton Foundation enthusiastically supports scientific research that touches on many…