The purpose of this project is to collect and analyze quantitative and qualitative data from participants in a long-term longitudinal study of multigenerational families to examine:(1) transitions in the religiosity of Baby-Boomers from pre- to post-retirement, (2) whether transmission of religiosity from Baby-Boomers to their adult children has diminished compared to the generations that preceded them, and (3) the bidirectional relationship between religiosity and mortality risk. There are two principal data components:

(1)The quantitative component involves collecting survey data from individuals who participated in the Longitudinal Study of Generations. Respondents include the G3 generation (N=975) whose members form the leading-edge of the Baby-Boom generation and their G4 children (N=893). In addition, mortality data will be obtained from the National Death Index for members of G1 and G2 generations.

(2)The qualitative component involves conducting about 40 in-depth interviews of all older respondents from the Families and Faith Project previously funded by the Templeton Foundation. These individuals are from the Depression Era Generation (now in their 80’s) and the Baby Boom Generation (now in their 50s and 60s). We will also interview a select sample of religious leaders (priests, pastors, and rabbis, N= 15-20, and selected older congregants)

Short-term project outputs include publications in peer-reviewed journals, conference presentations, organized symposia, and workshops at community and religious institutions. Long-term outputs include two books on religion and aging, one based on the qualitative data and the other using a mixed methods approach. Project outcomes will be the generation of new knowledge and insights about re-engagement of Baby-Boomers with religion, the role of contemporary families in the transmission of religion, and the development of a novel perspective on the relationship between religion and health in later life.