Templeton.org is in English. Only a few pages are translated into other languages.

OK

Usted está viendo Templeton.org en español. Tenga en cuenta que solamente hemos traducido algunas páginas a su idioma. El resto permanecen en inglés.

OK

Você está vendo Templeton.org em Português. Apenas algumas páginas do site são traduzidas para o seu idioma. As páginas restantes são apenas em Inglês.

OK

أنت تشاهد Templeton.org باللغة العربية. تتم ترجمة بعض صفحات الموقع فقط إلى لغتك. الصفحات المتبقية هي باللغة الإنجليزية فقط.

OK

We propose a three-year research program to examine strategies that facilitate self-control when working, waiting, or regulating emotion. Specifically, we aim to deepen scientific understanding of psychological distancing strategies, their utility in diverse situations requiring self-control, their relation to executive function and general intelligence, their normative development from early childhood through young adulthood, and their amenability to direct instruction. Specific activities include a set of controlled, random-assignment experiments with preschool and school-age children, adolescents, and young adults. Capitalizing on the control groups and a rich set of baseline measures in these studies, we will use cross-sectional data to examine age-related changes as well as individual differences in the spontaneous use of psychological distancing as a self-control strategy. We are a team of three psychologists with complementary training and research interests. Collectively, we aim to publish at least five empirical articles in top peer-reviewed journals. In parallel, we will make at least six presentations at national scientific meetings. Toward the end of our project period, we will write an in-depth theoretical review article for a top psychology journal (e.g., Psychological Review) and a shorter review article for a scientific journal with broader, interdisciplinary reach. To reach opinion leaders in policy and education, we will proactively seek coverage from high-visibility popular press outlets. The ultimate intent of this project is to identify and understand learnable, teachable strategies that facilitate self-control. If successful, our research will demonstrate that self-control in particular, and character in general, can be intentionally cultivated. Most importantly, we will improve our theoretical understanding of self-control, which should augment and focus ongoing efforts in character education to build self-control in youth.