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Board of Advisors

The Board of Advisors possess expertise in fields covering the full range of the foundation's activities and provide guidance on particular projects and larger strategic initiatives.
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Durre S. Ahmed Eurasia and Australia

Chairperson and Senior Research Fellow at the Center for the Study of Gender and Culture in Lahore, Pakistan. From 1976-2009 she taught at the National College of Arts, Pakistan’s premier arts institution where she was professor of psychology and communication, and director, Graduate Program in Cultural Studies.

Chairperson and Senior Research Fellow at the Center for the Study of Gender and Culture in Lahore, Pakistan. From 1976-2009 she taught at the National College of Arts, Pakistan’s premier arts institution where she was professor of psychology and communication, and director, Graduate Program in Cultural Studies. An internationally acknowledged expert on gender and Islam, her interdisciplinary interests include the social-psychology of religion, particularly Islam, and she has extensively researched women’s spirituality and issues related to gender, culture, religion, and science in the context of Islam and Muslim societies. Apart from numerous research papers, and book chapters, she is the author of Masculinity, Rationality and Religion: A Feminist Perspective, editor and contributing author of Gendering the Spirit: Women, Religion and Postcolonial Response, and a six volume series on Women and Religion. Since 1995 she has been engaged in researching and teaching socio-psychological and cultural dimensions of Islam and Muslims in Europe at various universities, educational and public institutions. Ahmed was awarded the Fatima Jinnah Memorial Gold Medal by the Government of Punjab, Pakistan, for outstanding contributions to education and research (2008), the Izzaz-i-Fazeelat President of Pakistan Award for Academic distinction (2009), and other international and national recognitions. She has served as a judge for the Commonwealth Writers Prize (2009) and  the Templeton Prize (2009-2011). Ahmed holds master’s degrees in psychology (Pb); sociology (Columbia); communication (Columbia); education (Columbia); and a doctorate in communication and education (Columbia).

James Arthur Eurasia and Australia

Professor of Education and Civic Engagement and Head of the School of Education in the University of Birmingham. He completed his masters and doctorate at Oriel College, University of Oxford, and is editor of the British Journal of Educational Studies. He has written widely on the relationship between theory and practice in education, particularly the links between communitarianism, social virtues, citizenship, religion, and education. Recent books include a critical assessment of John Henry Newman’s educational works for Continuum’s Library of Educational Thought.

Professor of Education and Civic Engagement and Head of the School of Education in the University of Birmingham. He completed his masters and doctorate at Oriel College, University of Oxford, and is editor of the British Journal of Educational Studies. He has written widely on the relationship between theory and practice in education, particularly the links between communitarianism, social virtues, citizenship, religion, and education. Recent books include a critical assessment of John Henry Newman’s educational works for Continuum’s Library of Educational Thought. Other recent publications include: (2010)  Education, Identity and Religion, Routledge, London, ( 2009) (ed.) A Reader in Educational Studies, Routledge, London, (2009) (ed.) Handbook in Educational Studies, Routledge, London, (2008) (ed.) Citizenship Studies, 4 volumes, Sage, London, and (2008) (ed.) International Handbook in Citizenship and Democracy, Sage, London. Arthur is Director of Citized (www.citized.info) and Learning for Life (www.learningforlife.org.uk) and he has produced a series of major research reports on citizenship and values education which have fed directly into policy decision making at a national UK government level.  
 
 

Francisco J. Ayala North America

University Professor and Donald Bren Professor of Biological Sciences at the University of California, Irvine. He received his Ph.D. in genetics from Columbia University. Ayala has been president and chairman of the Board of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and president of Sigma Xi, the Scientific Research Society of the U.S. He is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Philosophical Society and many foreign academies, and has received numerous prizes and honorary degrees.

University Professor and Donald Bren Professor of Biological Sciences at the University of California, Irvine. He received his Ph.D. in genetics from Columbia University. Ayala has been president and chairman of the Board of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and president of Sigma Xi, the Scientific Research Society of the U.S. He is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Philosophical Society and many foreign academies, and has received numerous prizes and honorary degrees. His scientific research focuses on population and evolutionary genetics, including the origin of species, genetic diversity of populations, the origin of malaria, the population structure of parasitic protozoa, and the molecular clock of evolution. He has published more than 1,000 articles and is author or editor of 37 books. Ayala also writes about the interface between religion and science, and on philosophical issues concerning epistemology, ethics, and the philosophy of biology. Born in Madrid, Spain, Ayala has lived in the United States since 1961, and became a U.S. citizen in 1971. From 1994 to 2001, he was a member of the U.S. President’s Committee of Advisors on Science and Technology. In 2002, Dr. Ayala received the National Medal of Science from President George W. Bush at a White House ceremony. He was awarded the 2010 Templeton Prize.

John D. Barrow Eurasia and Australia

Director of the Millennium Mathematics Project, professor of mathematical sciences at the University of Cambridge, and Gresham Professor of Geometry at Gresham College, London (2008-2011). Barrow was Gresham Professor of Astronomy from 2003-7 and is the only person other than Laurence Rooke, in 1657, to hold Gresham chairs in two different subjects. He graduated in mathematics from Durham University and received his doctorate in astrophysics from the University of Oxford, supervised by Dennis Sciama.

Director of the Millennium Mathematics Project, professor of mathematical sciences at the University of Cambridge, and Gresham Professor of Geometry at Gresham College, London (2008-2011). Barrow was Gresham Professor of Astronomy from 2003-7 and is the only person other than Laurence Rooke, in 1657, to hold Gresham chairs in two different subjects. He graduated in mathematics from Durham University and received his doctorate in astrophysics from the University of Oxford, supervised by Dennis Sciama. Barrow held positions at the Universities of Oxford and California at Berkeley before taking up a position at the Astronomy Centre, University of Sussex in 1981. He was professor of astronomy and then director of the Astronomy Centre at the University of Sussex until 1999. Barrow delivered the 1989 Gifford Lectures and is a recipient of the Locker Prize for Astronomy, the 1999 Kelvin Medal of the Royal Glasgow Philosophical Society, the 2002 Premi Ubu for theatre, the 2003 Italgas Prize, the 2005 Lacchini Prize for Astronomy, the 2006 Templeton Prize, the 2008 Faraday Medal of the Royal Society, and honorary degrees from the universities of Hertfordshire, Durham, and Szczecin. He was elected a fellow of the Royal Society in 2003, and is also fellow of Clare Hall, Cambridge. He is the author of more than 430 scientific papers on gravitation, cosmology and astrophysics, as well as 20 books, translated into 28 languages, which explore many of the wider historical, philosophical and cultural ramifications of developments in astronomy, physics, and mathematics and the author of the award-winning stage play, 'Infinities.'

Mark C. Berner North America

A social entrepreneur and consultant to foundations and non-profits, Berner is the CEO and co-chairman of Telos, a forum for Christian leaders of international stature from business, finance, science, religion, public policy, the media, the academy, and the arts, committed to renewing public culture. Previously, he was a managing partner and co-founder of SDG Resources, L.P., an oil and gas exploration company with operations in Texas and New Mexico. Berner was also a senior manager of a hedge fund at Credit Suisse First Boston and a partner in a New York law firm.

A social entrepreneur and consultant to foundations and non-profits, Berner is the CEO and co-chairman of Telos, a forum for Christian leaders of international stature from business, finance, science, religion, public policy, the media, the academy, and the arts, committed to renewing public culture. Previously, he was a managing partner and co-founder of SDG Resources, L.P., an oil and gas exploration company with operations in Texas and New Mexico. Berner was also a senior manager of a hedge fund at Credit Suisse First Boston and a partner in a New York law firm. He has served on a number of corporate and charitable boards and is a former Trustee of the John Templeton Foundation. He was educated at Yale, Oxford, and Villanova.

Andrew Briggs Eurasia and Australia

Professor of nanomaterials at Oxford University, Briggs currently holds an EPSRC Professorial Research Fellowship. He studied for his Ph.D. with Professor David Tabor in the physics and chemistry of solids group at the Cavendish Laboratory. He came to the department of materials at Oxford in 1980 to develop applications of acoustic microscopy with Professor Sir Peter Hirsch. Briggs was awarded a Royal Society Research Fellowship in the Physical Sciences, and within two years was appointed to a University Lectureship.

Professor of nanomaterials at Oxford University, Briggs currently holds an EPSRC Professorial Research Fellowship. He studied for his Ph.D. with Professor David Tabor in the physics and chemistry of solids group at the Cavendish Laboratory. He came to the department of materials at Oxford in 1980 to develop applications of acoustic microscopy with Professor Sir Peter Hirsch. Briggs was awarded a Royal Society Research Fellowship in the Physical Sciences, and within two years was appointed to a University Lectureship. With the invention of scanning tunneling microscopy he studied surfaces at ever higher resolution, using elevated temperatures to image oxides and semiconductor quantum dots during growth. Following a sabbatical at Hewlett-Packard Laboratories, he became interested in the properties of carbon nanomaterials for quantum computing, and these now constitute the focus of the research in his laboratory. He has led several interdisciplinary projects, with major industrial sponsorship from companies such as BNFL, Toppan, Hitachi, and Hewlett-Packard. He has over 500 publications, the majority in internationally refereed journals. In 2002 EPSRC appointed him Director of the QIP IRC, with a brief to build and coordinate a multidisciplinary team of researchers to address key challenges in Quantum Information Processing. Members of his laboratory have shown that electron and nuclear spins in endohedral fullerene molecules and other materials can be manipulated with exquisite precision, and that the memory time for quantum information can be at least a second. This paves the way for using such materials as components for solid state quantum technologies. 

William T. Cavanaugh North America

Senior Research Professor at the Center for World Catholicism and Intercultural Theology, and Professor of Catholic Studies at DePaul University in Chicago. He has degrees in theology from the universities of Notre Dame, Cambridge, and Duke, and specializes in political theology. Cavanaugh worked in a poor neighborhood of Santiago, Chile, in the 1980s, and that experience became the basis for his first book Torture and Eucharist (Blackwell, 1998). His other books include: Theopolitical Imagination (T. & T.

Senior Research Professor at the Center for World Catholicism and Intercultural Theology, and Professor of Catholic Studies at DePaul University in Chicago. He has degrees in theology from the universities of Notre Dame, Cambridge, and Duke, and specializes in political theology. Cavanaugh worked in a poor neighborhood of Santiago, Chile, in the 1980s, and that experience became the basis for his first book Torture and Eucharist (Blackwell, 1998). His other books include: Theopolitical Imagination (T. & T. Clark, 2002), Being Consumed (Eerdmans, 2008), The Myth of Religious Violence (Oxford, 2009), and Migrations of the Holy (Eerdmans, 2011). His books have been translated into French, Spanish, and Polish. He has published many journal articles, and is co-editor of the journal Modern Theology.

S. Barry Cooper Eurasia and Australia

Professor of Mathematical Logic in the School of Mathematics at the University of Leeds. A graduate of the University of Oxford, he obtained his doctorate on "Degrees of Unsolvability" from the University of Leicester, working with Reuben Louis Goodstein, and C. E. M. Yates at the University of Manchester. His research follows that of Alan Turing in its focus on the nature of mental and physical computation. It seeks to characterise the computational framework underlying emergence in nature and the causal structure of the real universe.

Professor of Mathematical Logic in the School of Mathematics at the University of Leeds. A graduate of the University of Oxford, he obtained his doctorate on "Degrees of Unsolvability" from the University of Leicester, working with Reuben Louis Goodstein, and C. E. M. Yates at the University of Manchester. His research follows that of Alan Turing in its focus on the nature of mental and physical computation. It seeks to characterise the computational framework underlying emergence in nature and the causal structure of the real universe. Author and editor of numerous books, including Computability Theory, New Computational Paradigms, and Computability in Context, he is a leading advocate of multidisciplinary research at the interface between what is known to be computable, and theoretical and practical incomputability. He is chair of the Turing Centenary Advisory Committee, which coordinates the wide range of Turing Centenary activities, is president of the association Computability in Europe, which is responsible for the largest computability-themed international conference series, and chairs the Editorial Board of its Springer book series "Theory and Applications of Computability." He is an organizer of the 2012 Isaac Newton Institute programme "Semantics and Syntax: A Legacy of Alan Turing" in Cambridge.

Andy Crouch North America

The author of Culture Making: Recovering Our Creative Calling, winner of Christianity Today’s 2009 Book Award for Christianity and Culture, and named one of the best books of 2008 by Publishers Weekly, Relevant, Outreach, and Leadership. In 2011 he became special assistant to the president at Christianity Today International, where he has served as executive producer of the documentary films Where Faith and Culture Meet and Round Trip, and as editorial director of the Christian Vision Project.

The author of Culture Making: Recovering Our Creative Calling, winner of Christianity Today’s 2009 Book Award for Christianity and Culture, and named one of the best books of 2008 by Publishers Weekly, Relevant, Outreach, and Leadership. In 2011 he became special assistant to the president at Christianity Today International, where he has served as executive producer of the documentary films Where Faith and Culture Meet and Round Trip, and as editorial director of the Christian Vision Project. He is a member of the editorial board of Books & Culture, a senior fellow of the International Justice Mission’s IJM Institute, and serves on the boards of Fuller Theological Seminary and Equitas Group, a philanthropic organization focused on ending child exploitation in Haiti and Southeast Asia. His writing has appeared in several editions of Best Christian Writing and Best Spiritual Writing. From 1998 to 2003, Andy was the editor-in-chief of re:generation quarterly, a magazine for an emerging generation of culturally creative Christians. For ten years he was a campus minister with InterVarsity Christian Fellowship at Harvard University. He studied classics at Cornell University and received an M.Div. summa cum laude from Boston University School of Theology.

Pranab Das North America

Professor of Physics at Elon University, Das was Program Director of the Global Perspectives on Science and Spirituality program and its successor, the GPSS Major Awards Project. These two programs identified and supported research in science and the human spirit by research teams around the world. Presently, Das serves as executive editor of the International Society for Science and Religion (ISSR) Library Project, a program to select a library of essential texts spanning science and religion and its related fields.

Professor of Physics at Elon University, Das was Program Director of the Global Perspectives on Science and Spirituality program and its successor, the GPSS Major Awards Project. These two programs identified and supported research in science and the human spirit by research teams around the world. Presently, Das serves as executive editor of the International Society for Science and Religion (ISSR) Library Project, a program to select a library of essential texts spanning science and religion and its related fields. Collections of this library's books are being distributed on a competitive basis to institutions of higher learning worldwide and an accompanying website (www.issrlibrary.org) and physical volume, the Companion to the ISSR Library, are in progress. Das studied as an undergraduate at Reed College, with theses in both theoretical physics and international studies His Ph.D. is from the University of Texas at Austin where he was a member of the Ilya Prigogine Center for Complex Systems. His academic work spans the fields of neuroscience, nonlinear dynamics and chaos theory, the physics of granular materials, media studies, and science and the human spirit.

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